An experience from the Musée d’Orsay

I call this watercolour, “Alone in Paris”. There are a number of reasons for this. Firstly, when I visited the Musée d’Orsay in Paris I was struck by the sheer volume of people milling around the famous works of art. It was so busy I wasn’t able to get up close to study how masters like Van Gogh painted. I felt that the visitors weren’t really looking at the art on display, they merely acknowledged their presence. You could say they were ticking a list, Monet – check, Van Gogh – Check, Renoir – check and so on. So I felt like I was the only person in the room at that given moment who really wanted to immerse himself in the painting.

I was thinking also, how Van Gogh would feel? So famous now but ignored during his own life time. Here is a link to a description of his self-portrait by the way. I don’t know if he would be happier today, people are still not really looking at his art, – trying to understand it. His art has become a trophy that the super rich buy to stroke their egos. I am not so famous and I sell to only those who really appreciate my watecolours, I like it like that.

My wife mentioned that my style in this painting is more similar to my earlier art which was more graphic or cartoon like. I have to agree, I think the reason for this is that I am unsure of myself as I am only starting to paint people. I would much prefer to paint my figures like say Benjamin Björklund,  which is to leave more for the viewer to fill in. I love Impressionism because it is so hard for me to achieve I think.

Alone in Paris: 52 x 34 cm

Click the thumbnail below to see the full-sized image

Alone in Paris 52 x 34 cm
Alone in Paris 52 x 34 cm

 

Life is good

Nordiska Akvarellmuseet

Cerold Johansson who is responsible for art acquisition at the Nordic Watercolour Museum has bought one of my paintings! It arrived safely today with the glass still intact. To say that I am happy would be a bit of an understatement 😀

https://www.akvarellmuseet.org/
https://www.akvarellmuseet.org/en/about-the-museum